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Sinead O'Conner Photographic Print signed By Deborah Feingold

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Deborah Feingold

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Deborah Feingold

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Limited Edition Fine Art Archival Memorabilia Giclee 1990
Sinead O'Conner Photographic Print signed By Deborah Feingold

Date: Published Sept 2008

Signed By: Deborah Feingold in Pencil

Edition: 21 Prints Available World Wide

Dimensions: Image 40 x 40cm / Paper 56 x 58 cm

Atelier: Dekkel Fine Art Publishing

Condition: New - mint condition

Medium: Archival Giclee On 300gsm Fine Art Paper

British Pounds£650
US Dollars$865
Euros€802
Japanese Yen¥111573

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Date: Published Sept 2008

Signed By: Deborah Feingold in Pencil

Edition: 21 Prints Available World Wide

Dimensions: Image 40 x 40cm / Paper 56 x 58 cm

Atelier: Dekkel Fine Art Publishing

Condition: New - mint condition

Medium: Archival Giclee On 300gsm Fine Art Paper

Sinead Marie Bernadette O'Connor born 8 December 1966) is a Grammy Award-winning Irish singer-songwriter.
O'Connor's time as singer for Ton Ton Macoute brought her to the attention of the music industry, and she was eventually signed by Ensign Records.

Soon after she was signed she embarked on her first major project, providing the vocals for the song "Heroine", which she cowrote with U2's guitarist The Edge for the soundtrack to the film Captive.
O'Ceallaigh, who had been fired by U2 for complaining about them in an interview, was outspoken with his comments about music and politics, and O'Connor began to adopt the same habits; she made controversial comments about the IRA and even directed negative remarks towards U2.

They had differing visions regarding her debut album and four months of recordings were scrapped.
During this time she became pregnant by her session drummer John Reynolds (who went on to drum with the band Transvision Vamp) and the record company pressured her to get an abortion.
Thanks largely to O'Ceallaigh's persuasion, the record company allowed O'Connor, 20 years old and by then seven months pregnant, to produce her own album.

O'Connor's first two albums (1987's The Lion and the Cobra and 1990's I Do Not Want What I Haven't Got) gained considerable attention and mostly positive reviews. She was praised for her voice and her original songs.
She was also noted for her appearance: her shaved head, often angry expression, and sometimes shapeless or unusual clothing.

The Lion and the Cobra was not embraced by the pop mainstream on a large-scale basis, but the album did eventually hit gold record status and earned a Best Female Rock Vocal Performance Grammy nomination.
The single "Mandinka" was a big college radio hit, and "I Want Your (Hands on Me)" received both college and urban play in a remixed form that featured rapper MC Lyte.
In her first US network television appearance, O'Connor sang "Mandinka" on Late Night with David Letterman in 1988.The single "Troy" was also released as a single in the UK and Ireland. A club mix of "Troy" would become a major US dance hit in 2002.