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James Brown Photographic Print signed By Deborah Feingold 1975

Artist

Deborah Feingold

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Deborah Feingold

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Limited Edition Fine Art Archival Memorabilia Giclee
James Brown Photographic Print signed By Deborah Feingold 1975

Date: Published Sept 2008

Signed By: Deborah Feingold in Pencil

Edition: 21 Prints Available World Wide

Dimensions: Image 460 x 370mm

Atelier: Dekkel Fine Art Publishing

Condition: New - mint condition

Medium: Archival Giclee On 300gsm Fine Art Paper

British Pounds£895
US Dollars$1190
Euros€1104
Japanese Yen¥153627

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Date: Published Sept 2008

Signed By: Deborah Feingold in Pencil

Edition: 21 Prints Available World Wide

Dimensions: Image 460 x 370mm

Atelier: Dekkel Fine Art Publishing

Condition: New - mint condition

Medium: Archival Giclee On 300gsm Fine Art Paper

(born May 3, 1933, Barnwell, S.C., U.S.died Dec. 25, 2006, Atlanta, Ga.) American singer, songwriter, arranger, and dancer, who was one of the most important and influential entertainers in 20th-century popular music and whose remarkable achievements earned him the sobriquet the Hardest-Working Man in Show Business.

Brown was raised mainly in Augusta, Ga., by his great-aunt, who took him in at about the age of five when his parents divorced. Growing up in the segregated South during the Great Depression of the 1930s, Brown was so impoverished that he was sent home from grade school for insufficient clothes, an experience that he never forgot and that perhaps explains his penchant as an adult for wearing ermine coats, velour jumpsuits, elaborate capes, and conspicuous gold jewelry. Neighbours taught him how to play drums, piano, and guitar, and he learned about gospel music in churches and at tent revivals, where preachers would scream, yell, stomp their feet, and fall to their knees during sermons to provoke responses from the congregation. Brown sang for his classmates and competed in local talent shows but initially thought more about a career in baseball or boxing than in music.At age 15 Brown and some companions were arrested while breaking into cars. He was sentenced to 8 to 16 years of incarceration but was released after 3 years for good behaviour. While at the Alto Reform School, he formed a gospel group. Subsequently secularized and renamed the Flames (later the Famous Flames), it soon attracted the attention of rhythm-and-blues and rock-and-roll shouter Little Richard, whose manager helped promote the group. The label's owner, Syd Nathan, hated Brown's first recording, Please, Please, Please (1956), but the record eventually sold three million copies and launched Brown's extraordinary career. Along with placing nearly 100 singles and almost 50 albums on the best-seller charts, Brown broke new ground with two of the first successful live and in concert albumshis landmark Live at the Apollo (1963), which stayed on the charts for 66 weeks, and his 1964 follow-up, Pure Dynamite! Live at the Royal, which charted for 22 weeks.